eBook Details

Anyone But You

By: Jennifer Crusie | Other books by Jennifer Crusie
Published By: HQN
Published: Oct 15, 2012
ISBN # 9780373771387
Word Count: Not Available
Heat Index
Are Best Seller 
EligiblePrice: $6.99

Available in: Secure Adobe Epub eBook, Secure Adobe eBook

Categories: Romance>Contemporary Romance>Romantic Comedy

Description


Part basset, part beagle, all Cupid...

For Nina Askew, turning forty means freedom--from the ex-husband, freedom from their stuffy suburban home, freedom to focus on what she wants for a change. And what she wants is something her ex always vetoed--a puppy. A bouncy, adorable puppy.

Instead she gets...Fred.

Overweight, middle-aged, a bit smelly and obviously depressed, Fred is light-years from perky. But he does manage to put Nina in the path of Alex Moore, her gorgeous, younger-by-a-decade neighbor.

Alex seems perfect--he's a sexy, seemingly sane, surprisingly single E.R. doctor--but the age gap convinces Nina that anyone but Alex would be better relationship material. But with every silver-haired stiff she dates, the more she suspects it's the young, dog-loving doc she wants to sit and stay!


 
Reader Rating:  starstarstarstarstar (1 Ratings)
Sensuality Rating:   lipliplipliplip
Excerpt:


The last thing Nina Askew needed was Fred.

"I want a puppy," she said to the brown-uniformed woman behind the scarred metal counter at Riverbend Animal Control. "Something perky."

"Perky." The woman sighed. "Sure. We got perky." She jerked her head toward the gray metal door at the end of the counter. "Through there, one step down."

"Right." Nina shoved her short dark curls behind her ears, grabbed her purse and walked through the door, determined to pick herself out the perkiest birthday present on four paws. So what if yesterday had been her fortieth birthday? Forty was a good age for a woman. It meant freedom. Especially freedom from her overambitious ex-husband and their overpriced suburban castle which had finally sold after a year of open-house hell. There was something good: she was out of that damn house.

And now she was forty. Well, she was delighted to be forty. After all, that was the reason she was getting a dog of her own.

The attendant joined her and said, "This way," and Nina followed her toward yet another heavy metal door. She was going to get a puppy. She'd always wanted a dog, but Guy hadn't understood. "Dogs shed," he'd said when she'd suggested they get one as a wedding present to each other. She should have known that was A Sign. But no, she'd married him anyway and moved into that designer mausoleum of a house. And then she'd spent fifteen years following her husband's career around, without a dog, in a house she'd grown to hate. Sixteen years in the house, if she counted this last year in divorced-woman limbo, waiting for it to sell. But now she had freedom and an apartment of her own and a great, if precarious, job. The only thing she needed was a warm, cheerful body to come home to.

The attendant opened the door, and the faint barking Nina had heard before became frantic and shrill. Nina stepped into the concrete cell block and stopped, blown out of her self-absorption by the row of gray metal cages where dogs barked to get her attention. She let her breath out, horrified. "Oh, God, this is awful."

"Spay your pets."The attendant stopped in front of the next to last cage. "Here you go." She jerked her head again. "Perky."

Nina went to join the woman and peered into the cage. The pups were darling--some sort of tiny, bright-eyed, spotted mixed breed--climbing over one another and tumbling and whining and barking. Perky as hell. Now all she had to do was choose one...

She moved closer and glanced in the last cage almost by accident. Then she froze.

There was only one dog in the cage, and it was midsize and depressed, too big for her apartment and too melancholy for her state of mind. Nina tried to turn back to the puppies, but somehow, she couldn't. The dog had huge bags under his dark eyes, and hunched shoulders, and a white coat blotched with what looked like giant liver spots. He sat on the damp concrete like a bulked-up vulture and stared at her, not barking, not moving. He looked like her great-uncle Fred had before he'd died when she was six. She'd liked her uncle Fred, and then one day his heart had gone, as her mother had put it, and that had been it.

"Hello," she said, and the dog lifted his head a little, so she stooped down and reached through the cage doors to scratch him behind the ears. He looked at her and then closed his eyes in appreciation for the scratch.

"What's wrong with him?" Nina asked the attendant.

"Nothing," the attendant said. "He's part basset, part beagle." She checked the card on his cage.

"Or he might be psychic. This is his last day."

Nina's eyes opened wide. "You mean..."

"Yep." The...

Reader Reviews (1)
Submitted By: pollekeskisses on Feb 14, 2011
I absolutely love this book! The characters, the dog 'Fred', they all made me smile and I just laughed my way through this book. If you like something else in romance for a change, I suggest 'Anyone But You'.
 

Anyone But You

By: Jennifer Crusie
x